American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering

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Verifying Wheat-Chickpea Varieties for Double Cropping on the Vertiosols of Central Highland of Ethiopia

Received: 23 November 2023    Accepted: 18 December 2023    Published: 28 December 2023
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Abstract

Climate change, land scarcity, and anthropogenic factors are the major challenges to agricultural productivity and cause food insecurity to feed the ever-increasing human population. Vertiosols in the central highlands of Ethiopia have the potential to produce a second crop using residual moisture after harvesting the main crop within the same cropping calendar. Farmers are practising double cropping using local varieties because there are neither verified research outputs nor awareness and promotion that support the practise of double cropping in the area. Field experiments were conducted during the 2021 and 2022 cropping seasons at Ejersa Lafo and Dandi districts in the West Shewa zone to evaluate the economic and agronomical feasibility of wheat-chickpea in double cropping combinations. The treatments consisted of four bread wheat varieties (Wane, Dursa, Abay, and Kakaba) and three chickpea varieties (Teketay, Dalot, and Natoli). The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The combined result showed that Dursa and Kakaba wheat varieties required the smallest number of days to mature (118 days), whereas Abay and Wane required 125 and 132 days to reach maturity, respectively. Kakaba and Abay varieties produced the highest thousand seed weight and grain yield, whereas Dursa varieties produced a statistically (P< 0.05) lower yield and thousand seed weight than the other varieties. The results indicate that the interaction of bread wheat and chickpea varieties had a significant effect on the grain yield of chickpea. Teketay chickpea variety double cropped with Kakaba bread wheat variety gave the highest grain yield (2595.15 kg ha–1). The highest economic benefit (ETB 235193 ha-1) with the highest MRR (275%) resulted from the Teketay chickpea variety, which was double cropped with the Kakaba bread wheat variety. Therefore, Kakaba bread wheat variety and Teketay chickpea variety could be recommended for double cropping on the vertiosol of the west Shewa zone (Dandi and Ejersa Lafo districts) and similar agroecologies.

DOI 10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12
Published in American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering (Volume 11, Issue 6, December 2023)
Page(s) 103-108
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Bread Wheat, Chickpea Variety, Economic Feasibility

References
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[3] Beuerlein, J., 2001. Double-Cropping soybeans following wheat. Extension Fact Sheet Available at http://ohioline. osu. edu/agf-fact/pdf/0103. pdf.
[4] Chalchissa, C. and Chala, M., 2020. Effect of Phosphorus Fertilizer Levels on Growth and Root Character of Chickpea (Cicer Arietinum L.) Varieties in West Showa Zone, Ejersa Lafo, Ethiopia. Academic Research Journal of Agricultural Science and Research.
[5] Chalchissa, C., Ashagire, H. I. and Hamza, I., 2020. Effect of phosphorus fertilizer levels on yield and yield component of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) varieties: The case of west Showa zone, Ejersa Lafo, Ethiopia. Adv. Crop Sci. Technol, 8.
[6] CSA. (2018). The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia Centeral Statistical Agency Agricultural Sample Survey 2017/18 (2010 E. C.): Report on area and production for major crops (private peasant holdings, Meher season). Statistical Bulletin 586: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[7] CSA. (2021). The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia Central Statistical Agency Agricultural Sample Survey 2020/2021 (2013 E. C.): Report on area and production for major crops (private peasant holdings, Meher season). Statistical Bulletin 590: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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[13] Haileyesus, D. and Mekuriaw, A., 2021. The adoption impact of wheat-chickpea double cropping on yield and farm income of smallholder farmers in Central Highlands of Ethiopia: the case of Becho district. Heliyon, 7(6), p. e07203.
[14] Jemberu, T., Fikre, A., Abeje, Y., Tebabal, B., Worku, Y. and Jorgi, T., 2018. Agronomic and economic evaluation of wheat-chickpea double cropping on the Vertisol of Takusa, North Western Ethiopia. Ethiopian Journal of Crop Science, 6(2), pp. 67-78.
[15] Kumar, S., Das, A., Hauser, M., Muricho, G., Degefu, T., Fikre, A.,... & Varshney, R. K. (2022). Estimating the potential to close yield gaps through increased efficiency of chickpea production in Ethiopia. Food Security, 14(5), 1241-1258.
[16] Rawal, V. and Navarro, D. K., 2019. Chickpea: transformation in production conditions. The global economy of pulses. V. Rawal and DK Navarro, (eds.). FAO, Rome, pp. 26-38.
[17] R. C. Littell, G. A. Milliken, W. W. Stroup, and R. D. Wolfinger, SAS System for Mixed Models, SAS Inst., Cary, NC, 2nd edition, 2006.
[18] Verkaart, S., Munyua, B. G., Mausch, K. and Michler, J. D., 2017. Welfare impacts of improved chickpea adoption: A pathway for rural development in Ethiopia. Food policy, 66, pp. 50-61.
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  • APA Style

    Chala, M., Chalchissa, C., Addisu, B. (2023). Verifying Wheat-Chickpea Varieties for Double Cropping on the Vertiosols of Central Highland of Ethiopia. American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering, 11(6), 103-108. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12

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    ACS Style

    Chala, M.; Chalchissa, C.; Addisu, B. Verifying Wheat-Chickpea Varieties for Double Cropping on the Vertiosols of Central Highland of Ethiopia. Am. J. BioSci. Bioeng. 2023, 11(6), 103-108. doi: 10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12

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    AMA Style

    Chala M, Chalchissa C, Addisu B. Verifying Wheat-Chickpea Varieties for Double Cropping on the Vertiosols of Central Highland of Ethiopia. Am J BioSci Bioeng. 2023;11(6):103-108. doi: 10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12,
      author = {Midekesa Chala and Chala Chalchissa and Bahiru Addisu},
      title = {Verifying Wheat-Chickpea Varieties for Double Cropping on the Vertiosols of Central Highland of Ethiopia},
      journal = {American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering},
      volume = {11},
      number = {6},
      pages = {103-108},
      doi = {10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.bio.20231106.12},
      abstract = {Climate change, land scarcity, and anthropogenic factors are the major challenges to agricultural productivity and cause food insecurity to feed the ever-increasing human population. Vertiosols in the central highlands of Ethiopia have the potential to produce a second crop using residual moisture after harvesting the main crop within the same cropping calendar. Farmers are practising double cropping using local varieties because there are neither verified research outputs nor awareness and promotion that support the practise of double cropping in the area. Field experiments were conducted during the 2021 and 2022 cropping seasons at Ejersa Lafo and Dandi districts in the West Shewa zone to evaluate the economic and agronomical feasibility of wheat-chickpea in double cropping combinations. The treatments consisted of four bread wheat varieties (Wane, Dursa, Abay, and Kakaba) and three chickpea varieties (Teketay, Dalot, and Natoli). The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The combined result showed that Dursa and Kakaba wheat varieties required the smallest number of days to mature (118 days), whereas Abay and Wane required 125 and 132 days to reach maturity, respectively. Kakaba and Abay varieties produced the highest thousand seed weight and grain yield, whereas Dursa varieties produced a statistically (P< 0.05) lower yield and thousand seed weight than the other varieties. The results indicate that the interaction of bread wheat and chickpea varieties had a significant effect on the grain yield of chickpea. Teketay chickpea variety double cropped with Kakaba bread wheat variety gave the highest grain yield (2595.15 kg ha–1). The highest economic benefit (ETB 235193 ha-1) with the highest MRR (275%) resulted from the Teketay chickpea variety, which was double cropped with the Kakaba bread wheat variety. Therefore, Kakaba bread wheat variety and Teketay chickpea variety could be recommended for double cropping on the vertiosol of the west Shewa zone (Dandi and Ejersa Lafo districts) and similar agroecologies.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Verifying Wheat-Chickpea Varieties for Double Cropping on the Vertiosols of Central Highland of Ethiopia
    AU  - Midekesa Chala
    AU  - Chala Chalchissa
    AU  - Bahiru Addisu
    Y1  - 2023/12/28
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12
    DO  - 10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12
    T2  - American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
    JF  - American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
    JO  - American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
    SP  - 103
    EP  - 108
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2328-5893
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231106.12
    AB  - Climate change, land scarcity, and anthropogenic factors are the major challenges to agricultural productivity and cause food insecurity to feed the ever-increasing human population. Vertiosols in the central highlands of Ethiopia have the potential to produce a second crop using residual moisture after harvesting the main crop within the same cropping calendar. Farmers are practising double cropping using local varieties because there are neither verified research outputs nor awareness and promotion that support the practise of double cropping in the area. Field experiments were conducted during the 2021 and 2022 cropping seasons at Ejersa Lafo and Dandi districts in the West Shewa zone to evaluate the economic and agronomical feasibility of wheat-chickpea in double cropping combinations. The treatments consisted of four bread wheat varieties (Wane, Dursa, Abay, and Kakaba) and three chickpea varieties (Teketay, Dalot, and Natoli). The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The combined result showed that Dursa and Kakaba wheat varieties required the smallest number of days to mature (118 days), whereas Abay and Wane required 125 and 132 days to reach maturity, respectively. Kakaba and Abay varieties produced the highest thousand seed weight and grain yield, whereas Dursa varieties produced a statistically (P< 0.05) lower yield and thousand seed weight than the other varieties. The results indicate that the interaction of bread wheat and chickpea varieties had a significant effect on the grain yield of chickpea. Teketay chickpea variety double cropped with Kakaba bread wheat variety gave the highest grain yield (2595.15 kg ha–1). The highest economic benefit (ETB 235193 ha-1) with the highest MRR (275%) resulted from the Teketay chickpea variety, which was double cropped with the Kakaba bread wheat variety. Therefore, Kakaba bread wheat variety and Teketay chickpea variety could be recommended for double cropping on the vertiosol of the west Shewa zone (Dandi and Ejersa Lafo districts) and similar agroecologies.
    
    VL  - 11
    IS  - 6
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Ambo Agricultural Research Center, Ambo, Ethiopia

  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Ambo Agricultural Research Center, Ambo, Ethiopia

  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Ambo Agricultural Research Center, Ambo, Ethiopia

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